Fiber Splitter for FTTH Applications

Passive optical network (PON) has been widely applied in the construction of FTTH (fiber to the home). With PON architecture, network service providers can send the signal to multiple users through a single optical fiber, which can help them save great costs. To build the PON architecture, optical fiber splitter is necessary.

What Is Fiber Splitter?

The fiber splitter is a passive component specially designed for PON networks. Fiber splitter is generally a two-way passive equipment with one or two input ports and several output ports (from 2 to 64). Fiber splitter is used to split the optical signal into several outputs by a certain ratio. If the ratio of a splitter is 1×8 , then the signal will be divided into 8 fiber optic lights by equal ratio and each beam is 1/8 of the original source. The splitter can be designed for a specific wavelength, or works with wavelengths (from 1260 nm to 1620 nm) commonly used in optical transmission. Since fiber splitter is a passive device, it can provide high reliability for FTTH network. Based on the production principle, fiber splitters include Planar Lightwave Circuit (PLC) and Fused Bionic Taper (FBT).

PLC Splitters

PLC splitters are produced by planar technology. PLC splitters use silica optical waveguide technology to distribute optical signals from central office to multiple premise locations. The output ports of PLC splitters can be at most 64. This type of splitters is mainly used for network with more users.

The Structure of PLC splitters

Internal Structure

The following figure shows a PLC splitter. The optical fiber is splitted into 32 outputs. PLC chip is made of silica glass embedded with optical waveguide. The waveguide has three branches of optical channels. When the light guided through the channels, it is equally divided into multiple lights (up to 64) and transmitted via output ports.

1x32-plc-splitter

Outside Configuration

Bare splitter is the basic component of PLC fiber splitter. For better protection of the fragile fiber and optimized use, PLC splitters are often equipped with loose tube, connector and covering box. PLC splitters are made in several different configurations, including ABS, LGX box, Mini Plug-in type, Tray type, 1U Rack mount, etc. For example, 1RU rack mount PLC splitter (as shown in the figure below) is designed for high density fiber optical distribution networks. It can provide super optical performance and fast installation. This splitter is preassembled and fibers are terminated with SC connectors. It’s ready for immediate installation.

rack-mount-plc-spllitter

FBT Splitters

FBT splitters are made by connecting the optical fibers at high temperature and pressure. When the fiber coats are melted and connected, fiber cores get close to each other. Then two or more optical fibers are bound together and put on a fused taper fiber device. Fibers are drawn out according to the output ratio from one single fiber as the input. FBT splitters are mostly used for passive networks where the split configuration is smaller.

PLC Splitters From FS.COM

Fiberstore offers a wide range of PLC splitters that can be configured with 1xN and 2xN. Our splitters are designed for different applications, configurations including LGX, ABS box with pigtail, bare, blockless, rack mount package and so on.

fs-plc-splitter

Conclusion

Fiber splitter is an economical solution for PON architecture deployment in FTTH network. It can offer high performance and reliability against the harsh environment conditions. Besides, the small sized splitter is easy for installation and flexible for future network reconfiguration. Therefore, it’s a wise choice to use fiber splitter for building FTTH network.

Originally published at http://www.fiber-optic-equipment.com

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